A Low Tech Method for unblocking Fallopian tubes

The Kadir-Buxton Fertility Treatment

As you are probably aware, fertility treatment is expensive and unblocking fallopian tubes has only a 17% chance of success. With expensive drugs this figure goes up to just 17.5%. In the 1980s I came up with a low tech medical procedure that can be done by a nurse without anaesthetic, and has a 100% success rate.

I had been interested in finding a cure for infertility problems since a work colleague had been having problems conceiving due to blocked fallopian tubes. I was with a girl friend, and we thought it would be worthwhile to see if it was feasible to unblock fallopian tubes. When we entered the womb via the cervix, which had to be done very slowly we found that the womb needs lubricating to avoid immense pain. However, this problem was overcome by orgasm. Orgasm provided enough lubricant to make the womb pain free. We found that the womb was also sensual and could achieve orgasm.

I was then able to feel the fallopian tube all the way to the ovary and manipulate it as a practice for unblocking fallopian tubes.

When it came to withdrawing my hand we found that the cervix was stretched open. With experimentation we found that tickling the cervix and going round it slowly shut the cervix. This is in itself useful because many babies can be lost when cervixes open prematurely. At present they need a stitch to keep the cervix shut, and this stitch has to be taken out at child birth. Some women, mainly prostitutes, have permanently open cervixes which is a problem in both conceiving, and in carrying babies to term.

The procedure for unblocking fallopian tubes is to first feel them for hardness, the hardest parts are those which are more blocked. Polyps are the sides of the fallopian tubes expanding outwards because of the pressure from the blockage, or foreign objects such as ball bearings and even pen tops. The blockage has to be squeezed out a millimeter at a time. When a hard part is reached the amount that can be squeezed out must drop to half a millimeter at a time in order to avoid pain. All blockages that I have found have been dead bacteria, or sometimes lemonade (coca cola in the USA) which is a result of a country wide practice of lesbians at Universities. If live bacteria is encountered the procedure should be stopped until it has been treated.

Because many women have been trying for years to have children some of them are past child bearing age by the time they get a successful treatment. Eggs, however, are still in the ovaries. They can be stimulated to be released by gently massaging the skin just above the ovaries. A small stinging sensation is felt when the egg is released. If the patient wishes a multiple birth then the massage can go on until a second stinging sensation is felt. It must then be stopped immediately or a third egg may be inadvertently released. Conception can then take place naturally.

As collecting eggs from donors has an amount of danger involved with the drugs used, I would suggest that my method be used in future.

I do feel that fertility should be a right, and my method of unblocking fallopian tubes should be taken up by the NHS. It would increase the success rate of fertility treatment drastically, and also cut down on more expensive treatments. At present in the UK the NHS is giving everyone IVF treatment for one cycle, which will cost £85 million a year. With Kadir-Buxton fertility treatment this cost can be significantly slashed.